Guy Bourdin

24Apr13

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Guy Louis Banarès was born December 2, 1928, at 7 Rue Popincourt, Paris. He was abandoned by his mother the following year, and was adopted by Maurice Désiré Bourdin, who brought him up with the help of his mother Marguerite Legay.

During his military service in Dakar (1948–1949), he received his first photography training as a cadet in the French Air Force.

In 1950 he returned to Paris, where he met Man Ray, and became his protégé. Bourdin made his first exhibition of drawings and paintings at Galerie, Rue de la Bourgogne, Paris. His first photographic exhibition was in 1953.Bourdin exhibited under the pseudonym Edwin Hallan in his early career.

His first fashion shots were published in the February issue of Vogue Paris in 1955. He continued to work for the magazine until 1987.

Bourdin married Solange Marie Louise Gèze in 1961, who gave birth to his only child, Samuel in 1967. His wife died of a heart condition in Normandy in 1971.

An editor of Vogue magazine introduced Bourdin to shoe designer Charles Jourdan, who became his patron, and Bourdin shot Jourdan’s ad campaigns between 1967 and 1981. His quirky anthropomorphic compositions, intricate mise en scene ads were greatly recognized and always greatly anticipated by the media.

In 1985, Bourdin turned down the Grand Prix National de la Photographie, awarded by the French Ministry of Culture, but his name is retained on the list of award winners.

Bourdin was one of the best known photographers of fashion and advertising of the second half of the 20th century. He shared Helmut Newton’s taste for controversy and stylization, but Bourdin’s formal daring and the narrative power of his images exceeded the bounds of conventional advertising photography. Shattering expectations and questioning boundaries, he set the stage for a new kind of fashion photography. Bourdin worked for Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar, and shot ad campaigns for Chanel, Issey Miyake, Emanuel Ungaro, Gianni Versace, Loewe, Pentax and Bloomingdale’s.

Since his death, Guy Bourdin has been hailed as one of the greatest fashion photographers of all time, and his son Samuel Bourdin released a book with the finest prints of his father’s work, called “Exhibit A” in 2001 (co-edited with Fernando Delgado). His first retrospective exhibition was held at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London 2003, and then toured the National gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, and Jeu de Paume in Paris.

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The luxuriantly bearded model Jonny Harrington was recently compared to a ‘tramp’ by one lesser newspaper. But the bearded look sees no sign of abating.

That’s why we asked Alex Glover, master barber at Murdock London , to talk us through the ins and outs of beard care. Here’s what he had to say:

-To avoid itchiness, grow your beard out from a clippered finish rather than a shaved finish which leaves needle sharp ends to the hair. It will take you back a week or so but is far more comfortable

-Using an exfoliator up to three times a week will keep the skin healthy and remove the dead skin which is normally sheared away when shaving.

-Hair shampoo is too harsh for beard hair. use either a special beard shampoos and conditioners or your face wash at least once or twice a week.

– Murdock London sells products like Jack Black Beard Lube which are good leave-in products to give a soft finish to the beard.

– If you have a long beard, use a beard brush or even a tooth brush to keep the hair in check. Stroke vertically from top to bottom.

– Most men have a natural hair line under the cheekbone with a few hairs above it. Shave these but don’t alter or reshape this line.

– Be careful when creating the line under the chin. If it curves upwards too much it can make it look as though you have a double chin.

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In 1975, Givenchy issued the first edition of their “Gentlemen” fragrance, a masculine combination of patchouli, vetiver and Russian leather notes. For 2013 the fashion house has re-imagined that signature scent for the modern age with “Gentlemen Only”. Featuring notes of green mandarin, pink pepper, nutmeg and birch leaves, cedar, patchouli and vetiver, it’s a distinct scent that provides a signature for the confident man.

The face of this Givenchy perfume is Australian actor Simon Bake


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Back to Easy Fit. I’m such an advocate of well-fitting tailored clothes, but the looser fits designers are re-introducing are secretly making me happy. Why? B/c some people don’t know the difference between tailored and too damn tight… if your junk is very visibly exposed maybe rethink it, unless you’re a rock star (in real life or in your mind– can’t hate on the dreamers). And if you’re sagging with too skinny jeans, you really gotta rethink some things… this is a real issue :-/ So going back to looser fits may just be what the people need. Looser fitting more airy silhouettes are making its way back to retail thanks to designers efforts over the past few seasons.


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Emilio Pucci (1914-1992) had a passion for women, a visionary sense of style, and an eye for color and design. With these talents he created a fashion house unlike any other. By the early ’50s his boutique on the isle of Capri was catering to wealthy sophisticates, heiresses and movie stars buying his “Capri pants”, silk scarves and lightweight separates. By the end of the decade, Jacqueline Kennedy and Marilyn Monroe were wearing his dresses, and by the mid-60s the label was synonymous with the gilded lifestyle of an international jetset. Today, the house remains as vibrant as ever – Victoria Beckham, Elizabeth Hurley, and Kylie Minogue are adherents.

The Pucci story is a modern epic with its roots in renaissance Italy: the brand’s founder, the Marchese Emilio Pucci di Barsento, was a charismatic aristocrat whose lineage extends back to the 14th century. It is a story of evolution: how a family company grew from one tiny store to an international brand with 50 boutiques worldwide (and a presence in 300 more). And finally, it is a tale of innovation: Pucci was one of the first brands to bear a logo, and a pioneer of diversification into interiors, athletic wear and accessories. It introduced free-moving, lightweight fabrics, pop art prints, and a new color palette into womenswear, and constantly pushed fabric and printing technologies.

Featuring hundreds of photographs, drawings, and candid shots from the archive of the Emilio Pucci Foundation, this tome captures the breathtaking elegance and drama of a unique brand. Vanessa Friedman’s text places Emilio’s achievements in the context of fashion history, and provides insight into the remarkable Pucci dynasty.

Available in four different cover designs, each depicting an original pattern from the Pucci collection.

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First published as a limited edition – now available in an unlimited popular edition!
The author:
Vanessa Friedman is fashion editor of the Financial Times, where she writes a weekly style column and the blog Material World. Previously, she was the features director of UK In Style, and contributed regularly to The Economist, The New Yorker, Vogue, and Entertainment Weekly. She is the winner of the Newswomen’s Club of New York Front Page award for specialty writing, and is on the advisory council of Princeton University’s History Department.


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Hutspot
is a brand new store/shop concept, centrally located in Amsterdam . In the shop young and upcoming creative talents have the opportunity to sell their products in their own space within the shop.

Literally everything is for sale… the artwork, the wall garden, the lighting fixtures, cupboards and shelving, the old 90cc Vespa scooter, even the cash register.
The location is Van Woustraat 4 (Albert Cuyp area)

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Today, Proenza Schouler, the high-concept womenswear brand designed by Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez, is set to relaunch its website in the final phase of a rebranding, undertaken in collaboration with art director Peter Miles, who has also worked with Céline and Marc Jacobs.

“Our original website, which we designed like three or four years ago, didn’t have a long-term plan; there was no business model,” McCollough told BoF in a wide-ranging conversation about the brand’s growing immersion in digital culture.

 

BOF BY VIKRAM ALEXEI KANSARA